Posts Tagged ‘creation’

A Big Bangin’ Good Time It Was!

May 27, 2018

 In the beginning Yahoweh banged out the big universe, E=mc², and while doing so he set aside one particular chunk of it to form the earth.

The earth was initially formless and void of life, and darkness occluded all the deep stuff that, really, when you get right down to it, had some great potentiality, but it needed a little help, and some serious diversity, so the impressively energetic activating Spirit Yahoweh began activating the elements and he was lol at the emergence of helium so he got into into mating the hydrogen with  oxygen and before you knew it Yahoweh was, like, skimming all over the surface of the waters.

Its true what’s been reported on both MSBNB and Foxxy that Yahoweh did in fact tame the electromagnetic energy that had begun banging around wildly: Let there be light, he said and guess what, yo, there it was: light. Things were brightening up.

And yo, check it out, y’all: wherever the light struck earth— Yahoveh called it day, and wherever the darkness prevailed on earth he called night. Nice little back and forth thing going on—in and out of the bright spot—from the very start. Some great possibilities here.

Now it just so happened that  the way the earth popped out—it had this little spinning action going on, which would in the long run make things really interesting for us homo sapiens later. And so the  revolving motion of the earth brought forth a very cool  morning-morphing-into-evening scenario.

Reflect

Therefore, since it would be easier for us to see what was happening in the daytime part of this developing arrangement, we call that whole once-around-the-axis revolution a “day,” meaning, you know, the whole 24-hour deal. . . as in, another day in the life, eh? You trackin’ with me?

But hey! Creator was just getting started, y’all.

Yahoweh spoke: Let there be a, like, an atmosphere in the midst of the waters, and let it get intimately involved with the waters and separate some waters from other waters.

And so Yahoweh breathed out this very expansive atmosphere, which retained some waters as hanging together and staying in the flow, while other waters drifted on up into the troposphere to do their rarified atmospheric thing. You can’t keep a good molecule down, and they’re gettin’ high just thinking about it.

Anyway, Yahoveh knew that, on down the road, folks would gaze up into that airy firmament and be inspired by the amazing expanse of it, so he gave it an impressive name: heaven. Meanwhile, back at  what would later become the ranch, that revolving day/night configuration was shifting into second gear. Therefore, by ’n by the second day was just as incredible as the first had been, if not more-so.

Yahoweh spoke: Let the waters below the heavens be gathered into one place, and let the dry land appear. And hey! It was good! Pangaea, baby, that’s what I’m talking about!

Yahoweh called the dry land earth, and the gathering of the waters he called seas, and he saw that it was good.

It’s all good!

WaterLine

Pickin’ up steam, Yahoweh kept a-goin’. Let the earth sprout vegetation, he declared. We’ll be needin’ some flora for these folks, y’all:  plants yielding their seed, and fruit trees on the earth bearing fruit with their stamens and carpels and fruit chromosomes and stranded DNA embedded in their seeds; and so on and so on.

And so on Pangeia was brought forth vegetation, plants yielding their genetic progeny

SilverSword

and trees bearing seeds with tree-deoxyribonucleic coding so that all subsequent tree-cells would get the message that God had spoke and he said it was good, y’all!  Propogate!

Meanwhile, down at the axis, that earth just kept spinnin’ along and there was evening and there was morning, a third day.

Then Yahoweh said, Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and even years!

And let them lights light up the earth. And it was so.

And within all this arrangement, Yehoweh set up two special lights: the greater light to govern the day, and the lesser light to govern the night.

That lesser  light is the one by which Tony Bennett or some ole crooner croons the tune: when the moon’s in your eye like a big pizza pie—that’s amoré!

Oh, and btw, while Yehoweh was doing all this, he also, like, got a creative handle on all them whizzing chunks of big bang detritus that were barreling through space and he, like, made the stars, maybe as an afterthought, I dunno.

He did very generously open up the heavens so that later organismic developmentals (see trailer) would get a little light on the subject, and make adjustments in their routine for the night phase because nights would be a cool change-of-pace from the day-to-day routine, because we could look up at the stars and be inspired by them and make up stories about Orion and the BiG Dipper and the Big Bang and whatnot.

There was evening and there was morning and that’s the way it is, fourth day, hey hey hey! Stay tuned for a fabulous 3-day weekend!

Glass Chimera

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Fishy, fishy, swimming around

April 26, 2017

Fish

Fishy, fishy, swimming around,

in the site and in the sound;

what venturesome hand or eye

could encode thy swishing symmetry?

From what current, sloshing seas

did you swim aground ‘neath GMO trees?

On what slickery limbs did you then crawl

to spy out land and stand up tall?

And what shoulder, and what art

could twist the sinews of thy heart?

And when thy fins began to crawl

what encoding hand did guide it all?

What the software? what the mode?

In which startup was it written, your code?

What bold investor? what venture tax-free

dared to make investment in thee?

When companies tossed out their dividends

and water’d the world with their vested friends:

did they rejoice their work to see?

Did them who wove the web weave thee?

Fishy, fishy, swimming around,

in the site and in the sound;

what human hand or eye

could create they swishing symmetry?

Glass Chimera

Fifth Dimension

April 11, 2016

If you are looking for a better way of life–a city, perhaps, or a country, in which plenty of good stuff replaces the deficiencies and poverties of this present arrangement. . . if you are thinking, perhaps wishing, for a nation or kingdom in which justice prevails instead of corruption and all is well instead of screwed-up, the only way you can find such a ridiculous thing as that is to first believe that it does exist somewhere.

Or believe that it can exist.

Now if you can believe that, if you already do believe it, then your mind, your soul, is operating in a realm that is beyond the world that we know and live in and walk around in every day.

Take a look at the device on which you are presently reading this message. Over on the right side of your electronic view is a vertical line; it is the edge of the screen. At the top of that line is a pixel, or point, positioned in the upper right corner of your screen. From that point, look downward along that straight line until your attention is placed directly on the point at the very bottom corner of the screen.

Now your mind has conceived a straight, vertical line. It represents one dimension of your view, that dimension being what we shall define as “height.”

From that point at which your mind arrived at the right-lower corner of your screen, train your eye along the bottom edge, so you are viewing a straight, horizontal line extended between that corner and the one on the bottom-left. Now that you have conceived that horizontal line, you have arrived at the idea of a third dimension, which we shall define as “width.”

Now imagine.

Imagine–as you ponder that pixel-point in the left-lower corner of your screen–imagine another line, beginning at that point and extending through airspace directly to your left eye. Now you have conceived the idea of a third dimension, which we shall define as “depth.”

Next, consider that from your original starting-point–which began from the top-right and then went from there to the lower-right and then over to the lower left and then directly from the screen to your eye–consider that it took a little while for your eye to perform all that viewing. Now your mind has arrived at an idea of a fourth dimension, which we shall define as “time.”

Now consider this:

There is a whole universe out there, far beyond the confines of that line on the right side of your device, far beyond the bottom edge of your screen, and extending far, far beyond the distance from your screen to your eye. Furthermore, this universe has existed for a much longer time than you can conceive or imagine. Within this universe you can find some quite amazing developments. Take, for instance, this:

Rose

Now if you can plant a seed from which such a wonder as this can be brought into existence–far surpassing, in its complexity and beauty, the simplicity of these straight lines you just pondered,  and far surpassing our simple concepts of height, width, depth and time by which we thought rationally about these phenomena, and if you can understand that this rose will grow and bloom, and if you can appreciate that people who pass by may marvel at its beauty, and they will wonder how such a beautiful thing could arise from the mere dirt of this earth.

If you suppose that just maybe this did not just happen through the natural processes of this physical world, but rather that  there is– preceding it all and activating all–there  is a sentient creator who conceived it all and then caused it all to happen and then allowed you to enter into it and be astounded at the beauty and wonder of it all, and if you can believe that you yourself can enter into this creative vortex by the power of God and participate in that creation. . .

. . . then you have entered into the realm of the fifth dimension, which we shall define as “faith.”

Welcome to the kingdom of God.

Glass half-Full

Air upon a strung string

December 7, 2014

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxZbVwrGOrc )

Somewhere in the world virtuoso

fingers

dance upon stretched

string,

string strung upon neck of

wood.

Would you listen to it.

Somewhere in the world craftsman

fingers

carve upon some shapening piece so

peace

reigns upon a great grand old hall,

if only for a moment,

all

ears and eyes are trained upon

artisan

person pulling passion out of

string strung on

wood.

Would you hear it if you

could

not that you should

of course.

Coarse

wood sawn from spruce still

produce

sublime sound to

astound our attentive eyes and ears;

fears

fade as rapt attention in

suspension of all stress while all the

rest

is strung upon the tender breast of

humankind.

Behind

the finery and excellence you see rugged old

tree

whose seed was slung upon an earthen floor

for

Creator God to raise a tree, as

He

will yet raise you and me

and stretch us upon his neck of time,

fine

as gutty string doth

bring

music to our heart and mind.

Surely we all will someday shine

fine

in God’s good time.

Glass half-Full

In the Moment

November 27, 2012

In the moment of inspiration,

in that potent encounter with

the creating inclination of the universe,

in that moment, say,

as Beethoven listened at his piano

while stark moonlight shone through

the frosty window,

and struck upon his keys–

his dark tones and light strokes

provoking

sonata of exquisite beauty and

tender moonlit passion;

Or in that vibration

when the musician touches his bow

to strings;

Or when the artist brushes paint on blank

canvas;

Or when the writer flings his words

on electrons of exquisite power–

in that moment,

do you

attribute it to the withering I, me, my?

or to the source of all creation

as Handel did

or Bach.

As for me and mine,

in that precious moment

we are so small

and trembling, that we draw back the curtain

to peek

beyond data-folding neo-cortex,

beyond eternity’s veil.

Order minus Chaos = Passion

October 31, 2012

As I was listening to WDAV today, an airy figment of Telemann music  traveled through the radio and struck  my ears. As it happened, the music plucked upon my very soul and, there I was, unexpectedly in the middle of the day,  transported for a few minutes, back into the 18th century.

Not literally, of course, but in my mind. My thoughts escaped this present  world of  work and woe, and took refuge in an age long gone, a era of reason and order, long before the rude disruptions of  world wars, global warmings and worldwide economic warnings.

Although there has always been an element of disarray and chaos in human activity, our hindsight view of the 1700s  encompasses a world where composers like Telemann or Bach or Handel or Antonio Vivaldi could be seated at a musical instrument and, through intense toil and otherworldly inspiration, impose cryptic inked symbols onto a paper manuscript and thereby draw some amazingly expressive order out of the vast cosmos, by constructing a great work of music.

My all-time favorite is Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. Here’s the winter movement of it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uC-USAB530A&feature=related

Now, a few hours beyond that midday moment, the workday is over; the radio-induced flight of fancy has passed, and I sit at home sharing with you that time-travel moment–a sudden glimpse into 18th-century passion.

And I hope to remind us all that, out there in the midst of human noise and haste and confusion, someone somewhere has expressed passionate order by drawing it out of troublesome chaos. That happened three hundred years ago, and somewhere on earth, even now, some person or persons are deriving creative sense from the hopeless nonsense of our present world.

It’s a little bit like touching that moment when  Logos  spoke electromagnetic light into existence from the dark void.

 

CR, with new novel, Smoke, in progress

Dust of the Ground, Elements of the Earth

October 21, 2012

In his best-selling book, the Torah, which was later expanded to become the Bible, Moses wrote that God formed man from the dust of the ground.

In his best-selling book, the Origin of Species, which was later expanded to become a basis for evolutionary science, Darwin posited that man descended through natural selection from the elements of the earth.

What’s the difference between these two traditions?

Mainly, the difference is that word “God.”

Either way you look at it, mankind has a pretty muddy past, and probably a muddled future. However, if you accept the inclusion of “God”  in your cosmology,  your chances of getting cleaned up are probably better.

Glass half-Full

From hydrogen to iron is a long way

June 20, 2012

A man stands on the earth and looks up into the night sky. He sees the stars, the moon, the great expanse of space. He wonders at the immensity of it all, the brightness, the contrast, the arrangement of stars and heavenly bodies in the visible universe. He ponders it. He considers it all, from the perspective of one who knows a little something about how things seem to fit together here on earth. Could it have all just happened at random, or is there some grand design to it?

Yes.

I’m not the only person to have done this. Take, for instance, the famous progressive leader from antiquity, Moses. He started his best-selling book with this statement, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”

Let’s compare this statement to Robert Hazen’s statement in his brilliant best-selling book, The Story of Earth.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Story-Earth-Billion-Stardust/dp/0670023558

Mr. Hazen wrote, “In the beginning, all space and energy and matter came into existence from an unknowable void.”

So compare: What Moses calls “heavens and earth,” Robert calls “space, matter, and energy.”  They are both writing about the same thing, which is all that stuff out there that we’re not sure about exactly what it is and cannot really prove how it got there.

Faith and Science are equally clueless.

The scientific method, assuming we cannot know everything but positing that we can know some things, then proceeds to prove, by successive experimentation what we can know, one hypothesis at a time. Makes sense to me.

Faith, on the other hand says, there’s a lot out there I don’t know, but I do understand this: It didn’t all just happen. There is an order to it, and, Whoever designed it included in the program a personal conviction within me that I didn’t just randomly pop out of the stardust.

Pretty naive, nest ce pas?  I believe it.

So faith is one thing, and science, or knowledge, is another. One thing I like about science is: it is so very useful. Take, for instance, Mr. Hazen’s very instructive scientific book. His introduction and first chapter have communicated to me light years of knowledge about  the universe that I had not understood before. His explanation, based on the elements, and the Periodic Table by which we successfully contextualize their intricate interactions in the physical world, starts with the simplest element, hydrogen. Mr. Hazen then guides us very simply and concisely through the mysterious process of nuclear fusion. Fusion combined small quantities of  the original, simplest element–hydrogen–to produce helium.  Then, by continuing fusion, other more complex elements such as carbon, oxygen, nitrogen were created, and ultimately life itself.

That last phrase, “life itself” is where misunderstandings between us Faith-holders and some Scientists tend to arrive at different conclusions. No problem for me though. I believe that Moses could stand on a sandy beach, as I did yesterday, and know, yes know, that indeed “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”

That’s my story and I’m stickin’ to it. But hey, even though I’m a person of faith, I can still move on, and learn some stuff. I wish I could have seen this cumulative hydrogen/fusion stuff in sixth grade instead of starting our science class with the atom, which was like starting a great story on page 7 instead of page 1.

But back to the future, or excuse me, to what is happening just now. . .here is something I learned yesterday, after standing on a Hawaii beach and contemplating the universe, and then reading Mr. Hazen’s fascinating book:

“Iron is as far as this nuclear fusion process can go. When hydrogen fuses to produce helium, when helium fuses to produce carbon, and during all the other fusion steps, abundant nuclear energy is released. But iron has the lowest energy of any atomic nucleus. As when a blazing fire transforms every bit of fuel to ash, all the energy has been used up. Iron is the ultimate nuclear ash…”

In other words, after all that high-heat nuclear goings-on after Big Bang but before earth, a big hunk of iron was left over when things cooled down a bit. And that chunk of mineral/rock was (and yes, I am vastly oversimplifying this) our earth!

Praise God! What a piece of work is earth.

Glass half-Full

Quantum design, by Intelligent mechanics

August 28, 2011

“He doesn’t believe in evolution,” spoken about a political candidate.

How about baseball–does he believe in baseball?

“Well, yes. I think he likes the Cowboys, er, I mean the Rangers. And he likes the Yankees. I mean…Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, ya gotta love ’em, and Yogi Berra, who said ‘the future ain’t what it used to be.'”

Probably not the Red Sox then. He probably doesn’t like the Red Sox, if he likes the Yankees? “Uh, no, he’d say anybody but the Red Sox.But maybe the White Sox. I think he likes them.”

What about apple pie? Does he believe in apple pie?

“Well, yes, probably. I mean…this is America, for God’s sake.”

The flag–does he believe in the flag?

“Absolutely.”

What about Chevrolet? Would he drive a chevy to the levee?

“Actually, he drives a Ford. Have you driven one lately? Besides, I don’t think he can afford a Volt.”

How ’bout mom? Does he believe in motherhood?

“Oh, yes. Surely he does. I mean, who doesn’t? How else would we have gotten here? Everybody has a mama.”

But not by evolution.

“No.”

What about Natural Selection?

“Oh…sure. Naturally. I’m pretty sure he believes in that. And he may even acknowledge natural selection and evolution as two of the plethora of natural processes that contribute to biological development, within creation.”

So he believes in Creation?

“Sure. How can you not? I mean, its all around us.”

So you believe in Intelligent Design?

“Oh yeah, I’ve always had a Mac. I use it for everything.”

You’re not into Windows, then?

“Nah. Any Windows-based system can’t hold a candle to a Mac. But I will say this about windows: Whenever God closes a door, he opens a window. I’m thankful for that.”

Well ok then. I’m glad to hear it. Thanks for sharin’.

“Da nada, man. Its a free country.”

CR, with new novel, Smoke, in progress