Archive for the ‘birds’ Category

The Scarecrow some of us have known

March 11, 2016

We put ashes of my nephew away yesterday, in the cold ground. It was a sad event, tragic that a young man could strive through the difficult decade of being between age 20 and 30, only to have it end abruptly.

Searching for love, with a false start or two, and fathering two young ones into this world along the way, Erik had just started to turn the corner between bittersweet street and true love way with his very own soulmate, Nora. Then he passed away. Absolutely no one was expecting it. It was a tragedy for our large extended family. On a perfect March day, we put what was left of his earthly remains away, but not the memories.

His sister Samantha, my niece, pierced the hearts of us all with her tender remembrance of Erik’s life–his unique presence in the history of our world, his wry humor, his fierce determination to provide for the young family despite all the pitfalls of finding and retaining work in this fiercely competitive world. More importantly though, his sister brought to our gathered attention his intense love for his children, his blooming love with his newfound bride of five months. And then his sister mentioned the bluebird.

In many ways, the young man who passed reflected the troubles of our times. At age 30, he was a tender shoot, untimely snipped by death’s sharp shearing. In sibling Samantha’s sensitive eulogy, she explained why Erik called his wife, his true love, “bluebird.”

It was a reference to a very timely, profound love song by a young singer I had never heard of. But at the memorial ceremony, a recording of the ballad was played for us to hear as we reflected up the life and childlike legacy of the deceased.

As an aging songwriter of sorts myself, I was struck dumb with admiration when this line–about the power that is unleashed in a lonely heart when absolute love is at last discovered– poured out of the sedate funeral home sound system:

“In my heart stands a scarecrow, and if he’s hurt he doesn’t say so; he chases everything he loves away.

But at night, when it’s colder, there’s a bluebird on his shoulder, and he whispers that he’ll hold her one bright day. . .”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WfwNwjbbpA

Such a love song I have never heard. And such a life as Erik’s will never again be lived again. John Fulbright’s tender love tune came to my attention through this memorial to Erik, his beloved widow Nora, and his sister’s remembrance of it all. The song, linked above, captures more than I could ever explain in words.

Thank you, Sam, for sharing this rich love of life lived by your brother, which has now been passed to us by his passing.

Glass half-Full

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February

February 14, 2016

Woodpkr

Little woodpecker out my window pane

why you have on you spotty self that little red mane?

Did you flitter by the bird store for that sporty red hat

or did your mama give you that?

It’s pretty good though; you got that little red spot;

makes me appreciate just what you got,

a lively color to brighten this wintry scene,

so by this weary human you now be seen.

Thanks for stopping by, oh little friend of mine;

come, display you red spot any time.

StripesBird

And you, you little sparrow with stripy breast;

I hope you know we’ve given you the best

of bird seed that human money can buy;

we put it out so you’d stop by.

This wintry scene is dreary and cold,

and this man inside be weary and old,

but so glad to share a seed or two

with stripy little critter like you.

Yes, we be so happy to provide

for critters who on the wind can ride,

One day my soul will glide away from here;

will you be there to help me steer?

Glass half-Full

An English lesson for Birdbrains

January 22, 2016

In the English language, appending an “s” at the end of a common noun renders the word plural, as in:

Birds eat.

Example:

BirdsEat

The other side of the story  in English is this: appending an “s” at the end of  a verb designates the present tense:

Bird eats.

Example:

BirdEats

In the Faith language, appending a statement of faith to an event renders it more meaningful.

Example:

“Look at the birds of the air, that they do not sow, nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your Heavenly Father feeds them.”

In Economics language, appending a bird pic and a statement of faith to an unemployed birdbrain’s idle musings renders the event an experience of faith instead of foolishness.

That’s today’s lesson.

Go in peace.

Peace

Glass half-Full